Browsing the archives for the history tag.


A Historical Experience on a Road Trip to California National Parks

american history, National Park, National Parks, Travel, travel and history, travel and leisure

A Historical Experience on a Road Trip to California National Parks

 Joe Laing, El Monte RV

What a perfect way to spend a vacation – traveling in an RV on a tour of California’s National Parks! This is truly a unique way to experience California and U.S. history as well as amazing people from our past. Explorers, adventurers, artists and Native Americans – all sorts of folks savored the beauty and also some of the adversity of California as they arrived year after year, century after century. Many stories are told within California National Parks.

Let’s start in Southern California and work our way up to the northern reaches near the Oregon border. We will move not only through the deserts of the southwest where archeologists find historical treasures, but also through wild lands of rugged mountains and tall trees where American Indians hunted and gathered for their families. We’ll visit Gold Rush Country where miners laid down their lives for riches beyond measure. As you travel in an RV you will never lack for a place to stay, as there is an abundance of RV parks everywhere you go.

At Channel Islands National Park, off the coast in Southern California, you will be visiting five amazing islands that have been the subject of many years of research by scientists and historians. Each island has its own story. The Chumash inhabited the islands for thousands of years, yet were decimated when traders and explorers brought in disease. These same traders exploited resources as they hunted seals and otters. Because the islands are so isolated, they have a wealth of unique plant and animal life which creates in itself a wonderful reason to visit.

Heading east now, you will want to visit Joshua Tree National Park next. This desert park offers views into a rich history, with a fascinating story set in an almost surreal environment. There are numerous archeological and historic sites to explore. It is imperative you stop at the museum to see the Campbell Collection which consists of numerous artifacts, notes and photos which tell the story of early cultures.

On north now to Death Valley National Park! You simply cannot visit California without stopping here. You may not believe how much history this park can contain. However, you can’t deny that the Twenty Mule Team wagons have made an impression on young and old ever since they entered the history books. You have the opportunity to visit a long list of ghost towns such as Chloride City, Greenwater or Harrisberry. And to get a look into the life in this desert area in the 20s and 30s, be sure to stop at Scotty’s Castle.

Again heading northward, you will come to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks where the breathtaking beauty of the giant trees and rugged mountains will encourage you to get out in the fresh air and get some recreation time in. These side-by-side parks lie in the San Joaquin Valley and have a six thousand year history at least, with hunters and gatherers living in this Southern Sierra wonderland. More came in later years – the trappers and miners, the sheepherders and the loggers. Learn the story of Walter Fry, who arrived as a logger, but after counting the growth rings on one of the trees he cut, decided he wanted no part of ending over 3,000 years of growth.

Don’t miss Yosemite National Park and learn all about our well-known John Muir and all he did to have this area protected as a national park. Experience the views as did Ansel Adams through his camera lens. This park is filled with history and you should allow many days to take it all in. There is so much about this park that can be said, that we’ll leave it at – GO!

Finally you will come to your last two stops, very different from each other – Lassen Volcanic National Park in north central California and Redwood National Park on the coast. Lassen is filed with meadows, lakes and, of course, volcanoes. More than one! Discover the wild stories of the Native Americans who lived and raised their families in the Lassen area. Find out all about the effect that American Indians and the loggers had on Redwood National Park. The wildlife and beautiful coastline at Redwood National Park are some of the main attractions here. As you explore either park, you will learn so much about this region of California and how natives and European explorers came and forged out a living. Although your tour is now at an end, the memories will last forever!

About the Author

Joe Laing is the Marketing Director for El Monte RV, your nationwide source for RV rentals. El Monte RV also sells used motorhomes through eight different locations across the United States. For more information on purchasing a used motorhome see http://www.elmontervsales.com/.

Get a daily dose of history from “The Famous Daily”

history, History of Holidays, Universities

Check out the new site “The Famous Daily” for a daily dose of history in the form of articles about events that happened on a particular day in history.  Today’s Famous Daily for January 15th covers three big historical events on this date: the dedication of the Pentagon, The Democratic Donkey symbol, and the founding of the University of Notre Dame.

Check out the articles at the Famous Daily and join their email list to get daily updates on history and other topics.

1943 - The world’s largest office building, The Pentagon, is dedicated (Arlington, Virginia).

1870 - Thomas Nast creates the symbol of the democratic party, the donkey 

1844 - The University of Notre Dame is founded

Ramadan in Saudi Arabia

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DSC_4198

Originally uploaded by MadinahVision.com

Over at Flickr “MadinahVision.com” has posted an amazing set of photos from Saudi Arabia that showcase Ramadan, the 9th month of the Islamic Calender and a time when Muslims pray more than usual and fast from dawn until dusk every day. This is a time for Muslims to ask for forgiveness, do good deeds, pray, read the Koran, and more:

Ramadan at Wikipedia

Survived the Budget Breaking Cities

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Although I’d expected some high prices in Europe, there was still some vacation sticker shock when we got into Norway to find small waters at $3, hamburgers for $10, and buffets topping $60 per person.  Twitter pal @Brochner cleared this up a bit with this recent article about Europe’s most expensive cities.     We managed to visit 4 of the top 13 most expensive on this trip:    Oslo, Copenhagen, Munich, and Paris.     Luckily our budget stayed intact thanks to buying at grocery stores more than eating out, and staying in reasonably priced hotels and hostels (or in the case of Copenhagen and Munich, only visiting for part of the day).

I’ll need to do more research to figure out what’s up with the remarkable price disparity between Norway and Italy, where prices seemed fairly close to what we’d expect here in the USA, though I think the US is still cheaper for food than almost anywhere given the amazing selection and quality we have here.

I’m assuming that countries like Norway, which provide benefits Americans can only dream of like free health care and free universities, skew their economies towards those needs and this boosts the costs of hot dogs and beers, but I’m still not clear how that shakes out.



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